Author Topic: Introduction  (Read 3108 times)

Hannibal

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Introduction
« on: August 20, 2012, 02:15:19 PM »
Classical Greece:  The King’s Peace

“The Persian archer conquers what the Persian spearman could not.”
Unknown author, referring to the Persian gold coins bore a symbol of a Persian archer on one side.

Welcome to the design forum for the Classical Greeks, tentatively entitled The King's Peace.

This faction is designed to be a historical mercenaries faction in the vein of Monsters & Mercenaries.  It will be done as a single-deck release instead of the traditional two-deck "X vs Y" release.  This is because although Greek Hoplites are an iconic archetype among most gamers, any historical recreation for Battleground is actually rather dull.  Even with the innovations of the Peloponnesian War, a Greek army still was little more than an unbroken line of phalanxes with a few auxiliary troops.  With Persia already slated for another release, the most viable opponent of the Greeks would be the Greeks themselves and a "Sparta vs Athens" release would be two phenomenally similar factions.

Going forward with a release of a single mercenary faction of Greeks adds the most to not only the historical releases, but the game as a whole.  Greek mercenaries were in great demand to Rome, Carthage, the Kingdom of Macedonia, and the Persian Empire.  However, each of those factions also fought wars against Greek armies:  Syracuse battled Carthage for control of Sicily. Rome continually struggled against the Greeks of Southern Italy and across the Adriatic.  Phillip of Macedon conquered all of Greece as a prelude to an invasion of the Persian Empire, ultimately carried out by his son.  And the Persian invasions of Greece have become the stuff of legend.  Finally, players can reenact battles from the Peloponnesian War with just the units from the Greek mercenaries deck.


The time period chosen is deliberately flexible, from about 430-350 BC, roughly the period of the Peloponnesian War until the conquest of Greece by Phillip of Macedon.  Following Darius’s failed invasion of Greece, Persian kings used the financial might of the empire to do what its military could not:  subvert, divide, and conquer the Greek city-states one at a time.  Starting with supporting Sparta at the end of Peloponnesian War, Persian gold built navies and hired mercenaries in exchange for diplomatic and territorial concessions.  In this way, the treaty negotiated at the end of the Corinthian War resulted in Persia regaining dominance over the Greek city-states on the entire Ionian coast (modern day Turkey).  Known as the King’s Peace, this humiliating treaty was Alexander of Macedon’s excuse for invasion.

However, before Alexander, for almost a hundred years Persia would support one hegemon, only to switch sides in the next war (or sometimes in the middle of a current one!).  This policy of supporting constant internecine warfare kept Greece disunited and impoverished.  In addition to this, it created a large body of Greek mercenaries.  Citizens who had supported a defeated regime found themselves exiled, while victors found their farmland ravaged and no way to support themselves other than warfare.  

And their services were in great demand.  The heavy hoplite had given way to a lighter, more nimble force, but the phalanx was still the predominant heavy infantry at that point in the ancient world.  Smaller Greek cities would augment their militia to protect their lands.  The current hegemon, and whomever they were fighting, always needed more soldiers.  Persia and Egypt (when it was free) found the professional hoplites superior to any infantry they could raise.  Entire regiments, trained since youth to march beside each other, would be raised and hired based on the city-state of their origin.


I will post up the rough draft of the faction in the Design Discussion forum so that anyone who wishes can offer their thoughts and feedback.  I have not yet even made playtest proxies, but will post a notice on this board when I do.  

iamJMAN00793

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2012, 10:06:49 PM »
Yes!! This is great! I was really hoping this would happen. I will definitely be purchasing this expansion when it is released.
Every man dies. Not every man really lives. ~ Braveheart

Hannibal

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2012, 09:29:58 AM »
That's certainly good news.  If you are interested in being a playtester, we can sign you up.

iamJMAN00793

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2012, 12:02:13 AM »
That would be awesome! What do I need to do?
Every man dies. Not every man really lives. ~ Braveheart

Thranduil

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2013, 07:05:40 PM »
I to am interested in play-testing.  Also the background info is great and I am interested in seeing some design notes for specific units. 

Hannibal

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2013, 11:38:38 AM »
Excellent!  I've made you a playtester so you can examine the threads in the Design Discussion forum.  I haven't made much progress on this faction yet because we've been working on the Lords of Vlachold, plus finalizing Alexander vs Persia, plus playtesting some of the rules changes ideas such as the dice charge.  But this is the next project once we get some breathing space.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2013, 05:11:05 PM by Hannibal »

Ostegun

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Re: Introduction
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2016, 12:35:24 PM »
Very excited about this.
So far tried playing an army with Allied Hoplites, mercenary hoplites, iphicratean spearmen and for range Cretan archers with allied Greek cavalry. It resulted in a so-so army, So very happy to hear of a viable greek army.
The bull bears it's horns in hope. Hope to fend off those who would feed on it's love. The love of all the ones who held the wall upon which all memories have been written. Existence fussed to rip and explode the bull into the breach of threat.To scream in all the colors the essence of it's love.