Author Topic: New semi-official scenario "Engagement at Dusk" a.k.a. Tournament Ticking Clock  (Read 2129 times)

Kevin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5157
Two changes to Ticking Clock passed Rules Team votes, but it was decided that, rather than change the Ticking Clock Scenario, this modified version of Ticking Clock would be a new, distinct scenario.  Strongly recommended (rather than Ticking Clock) for use in tournaments; non-tournament players can substitute it (or not) for Ticking Clock as they see fit.

---------

Engagement at Dusk

As Ticking Clock, but with three additional rules.

1)  Each player gets 9 turns (rather than 8).


2) The last player's last turn is called the Nightfall Turn.  

On this turn, the player receives half command actions (rounded down), and units do not move except for two circumstances:  routing, and faction abilities which involve units switching places.


3)  Flying units which had not be previously engaged may not land after turn 6.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2013, 06:26:17 PM by Kevin »
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results. - Winston Churchill

Kevin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5157
The reasons for these rules are as follows:

9 Turns:  prevents an army from hiding in the rear of its deployment zone when facing Dwarves or other slower opponents.  More time to fight it out.

Nightfall Turn:  Under the regular Ticking Clock scenario, the player going second gets an extra move (= easier to grab a deployment zone) and (typically two) extra command actions over the course of the game.  The Nightfall Turn brings these into balance.

Flying Units:  This was a response to a clever but incredibly annoying strategy employed by a player at Championship:  take two dragons, roast the one unit which can shoot into oblivion, then land the dragons in point-yielding terrain and the opponent deployment zone on the last turn while the rest of your army huddles in the corner.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2013, 06:27:03 PM by Kevin »
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results. - Winston Churchill